Faculty Archive

  • Penn conference brought together scholars to discuss issues raised by the election, the transition of power, and the new presidential administration.

  • Grads join students in reading "Between the World and Me" for the 2017 Winter Reading Project

  • Ralph Rosen, Vartan Gregorian Professor of the Humanities, on satire, from ancient Greece to "Saturday Night Live."

  • Rebecca Bushnell’s new book looks at video games in light of Shakespeare, and vice-versa.

  • A collaborative event gives underrepresented groups an opportunity to explore the advantages of a Ph.D.-level education.

  • A look back at our top OMNIA stories from 2016

  • U.S. intelligence has recently confirmed Russia's interference with the 2016 presidential election through cyberattacks. We spoke with Mitchell A. Orenstein to discuss this attack, potential consequences for Russia, and future threats to other elections around the world.

  • Physicist Mark Devlin and his team of students harness cutting-edge technology to comb through the evolutionary history of the universe.

  • A special panel discusses multicultural democracy in a post-election world.

  • The science behind glass is not as clear as you'd think.

  • Political Psychology course encourages students to challenge easy explanations.

  • Richard Berk uses big data to foresee the future.

  • Arts and Sciences faculty on the fact, fiction, and future of artificial intelligence.

  • This fall, The Public Classroom @ Penn Museum’s “Science and Race: History, Use and Abuse” brought together more than two dozen internationally recognized experts from diverse backgrounds for a powerful, in-depth exploration of race, science, and justice, in a free series of evening classes geared to audiences ages 14 and above.

  • As we travel about an environment like a city, we instinctively learn how to get from one location to another and form a “mental map” of our surroundings. How do we do it? And why are some people great navigators while others are frequently disoriented?

  • Over the past two decades, MES has championed a multidisciplinary approach to environmental work and research and has trained leaders in the field today.

  • Discover the stories behind the professor of anthropology's favorite office items.

  • Searches are underway at Penn Arts and Sciences to recruit at least three new tenure-track faculty who combine humanistic studies with environmental themes over the next three years. These faculty positions will allow the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) to build a curriculum in environmental humanities and implement a graduate certificate and minor for undergraduates.

  • "Moonlight Revelry at Dozo Sagami"

  • A single short story published in 1841 in a Philadelphia-based magazine by a Boston-born writer invented modern French detective fiction. That is but one insight explored in "Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Science, Space, and Crime Fiction in France" by Andrea Goulet. Edgar Allan Poe’s story, which describes the investigation of a double murder surrounded by strange circumstances, continues to shape the global forms of the crime novel, Goulet says.

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