Faculty Archive

  • Brian Rose Works with Soldiers, Children, and Other Stakeholders to Save Humanity’s Cultural Heritage

  • Martha Farah can still remember the smell of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City’s Central Park: “I used to save up my allowance so I could take science classes there. I practically lived in the place.” For Farah, whose parents were both in the arts, wanting to become a scientist was a form of rebellion.

  • Two Penn Arts and Sciences faculty were recognized this year with the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, the University’s highest teaching honor. The recipients were Robert Ghrist, Andrea Mitchell University Professor in the Departments of Mathematics and Electrical and Systems Engineering, and Masao Sako, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy.

  • The high-decibel incivility on political TV talk shows doesn’t only take a toll on public discourse. Diana Mutz says that these shout-fests also affect the human body in ways that change how people think about politics and politicians.

  • Could there be a Leonardo without Vinci? The Italian Renaissance master is so closely associated with his home city, located about 30 miles west of Florence, that his name and birthplace have become inextricable. Scholars have traditionally viewed this era’s painters and sculptors through the lens of place, as though they were rooted in a primary locale: Leonardo and Michelangelo are said to epitomize a “Florentine” style, Bellini is identified closely with Venice, and Raphael’s style is said to be “Roman.”

  • Imagine a world where solar cells are so efficient at harvesting light that solar energy becomes a primary means of generating electricity.

  • The Penn Program in Environmental Humanities brings together a wide range of experts for its Urban Nature, Natural City event.

  • Dorothy Swaine Thomas Professor in Sociology Randall Collins looks at the ingredients that make up social magnetism.

  • Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy Masao Sako takes us way back.

  • RRL Professor of Psychology David Brainard examines the intricacies of color vision.

  • As one of the first Westerners to excavate there, Robert H. Dyson Assistant Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology Lauren Ristvet is building a broader picture of empire.

  • Associate Professor of History of Art Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw looks at color and context.

  • Assistant Professor of Biology Timothy Linksvayer discusses the complex behaviors of social insects.

  • Professor of Political Science Marie Gottschalk discusses mass incarceration in the U.S.

  • Presidential Term Professor Heather Williams thought long and hard about her short introduction to slavery.

  • John DiIulio Jr. discusses his new book on American bureaucracy and the disappearance of the federal worker.

  • Professor of Physics and Astronomy Philip Nelson discusses the ins and outs of authoring a science textbook.

  • Assistant Professor Margaret Bruchac is building an interdisciplinary program on long-term strengths.

  • Assistant Professor of History Vanessa Ogle describes how the world slowly got on the same schedule.

  • The Center for Africana Studies Summer Institute for Pre-Freshmen opens minds—and doors.

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