Faculty Archive

  • In a special podcast, we speak with Camille Zubrinsky Charles, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences, professor of sociology, Africana Studies, and education, and Director of the Center for Africana Studies, about the holiday and the progression of social movements like Black Lives Matter.

  • In a special podcast, we spoke with professors Michael Weisberg and Paul Sniegowski about their experience with the case—and whether public attitudes on evolution have changed—as well as lead counsel and Penn Law graduate Eric Rothschild and presiding judge John E. Jones III.

  • Peter Decherney, professor of English and cinema studies, documents the challenges associated with making films in a country with an uncertain future.

  • Junhyong Kim and his collaborators pursue innovation in a sea of data.

  • Tukufu Zuberi, Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations, examines African independence movements.

  • Three Penn Arts and Sciences professors share their thoughts.

  • Penn Arts and Sciences welcomed 24 new members to its standing faculty for the 2015-2016 academic year. The appointments include seven professors, one visiting professor, two associate professors, and 14 assistant professors, in 17 departments spanning the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

  • New Associate Professor of Political Science Daniel Hopkins received two awards from the American Political Science Association (APSA) this fall.

  • Before you set out for your next hike, make sure you bring sturdy boots, ample water, and an understanding of the cognitive underpinnings of your sense of direction.

    In order to navigate successfully, your mind must work out two problems simultaneously: knowing your current location and understanding which direction you are facing. Most people think that locating themselves spatially is a single thought process, but the cognitive logistics are more complex than that, says Professor of Psychology Russell Epstein.

  • The Claw! Descending into a congregate of plush toys, the claw pulls out a single prize and isolates it from the pack. We are all familiar with the popular arcade game; now imagine such a mechanism put to use at the atomic level. Eric Schelter, associate professor of chemistry, has discovered a molecular claw can be handy for separating rare earth metals. 

  • Was an 18th-century automated harpsichord player the forerunner of the Terminator? They’re both mechanical humanoids and are often analyzed together, but Heidi Voskuhl, associate professor of history and sociology of science, suggests that they shouldn’t always be.

  • In July, NASA’s New Horizons space probe captured dazzling images of the dwarf planet Pluto and its moons during a 31,000-mile-per-hour flyby. Surprising even some experts, the pictures revealed a vast variety of geologic features from frozen plains to streams. In the scientific community these photographs are provoking as many questions as they are answering.

  • The difference between having a passing familiarity with front-page news and truly comprehending world events comes down to a single word: context. “You can’t understand the snippets of national and global news reported by the media unless you have an understanding of the history surrounding those events,” says Tukufu Zuberi, Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations, professor of sociology, and professor of Africana studies.

  • Racial Differences in Education's Impact on Net Worth


  • Steven J. Fluharty, Dean and Thomas S. Gates, Jr. Professor of Psychology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience

    Photo credit: Candace DiCarlo

  • The Continued Long-Term Consequences of Mass Incarceration in the United States

  • Poet and essayist Charles Bernstein, the Donald T. Regan Professor of English, has received the 2015 Janus Pannonius Grand Prize for Poetry, along with Giuseppe Conte
    of Italy.

  • Was an 18th-century automated harpsichord player the forerunner of the Terminator? They’re both mechanical humanoids and are often analyzed together, but Heidi Voskuhl, associate professor of history and sociology of science, suggests that they shouldn’t always be.

  • A University of Pennsylvania research program has gathered together leading scholars and advocates representing strongly opposing views on today's most contentious church-state issues, not to forge a consensus, but to model how to disagree without being disagreeable, while identifying any unexpected common ground.

  • Guthrie Ramsey, Jr., Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of Music, discusses music biopic "Straight Outta Compton."

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