Faculty Archive

  • English Professor Michael Gamer on why Jane Austen may be more popular than ever, two centuries after her death.

  • Virtual reality is here. In fact, it’s everywhere. Beyond video games, it is helping therapists to treat PTSD, allowing medical students to do virtual operations, and letting engineers test vehicle safety before the car is built.

  • To better understand the mass movement of populations across the globe, Penn social science faculty are interpreting data, analyzing the effect of immigration on sending and receiving countries, and untangling the many complexities of immigration today.

  • Joyce’s novel inspires Bloomsday celebrations and creative student work.

  • Irina Marinov, Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Science, offers her perspective.

  • Penn Arts and Sciences faculty wear robes rooted in medieval tradition.

  • In partnership with the Philadelphia Museum of Art, History of Art graduate students participate in an object-based learning workshop.

  • During the 2016 presidential election, Saturday Night Live’s political skits became a regular feature on the Sunday morning news. SNL has continued to satirize President Donald Trump, who slams the show on Twitter in turn. Though the media are new, they’re continuing a tradition that is centuries old, and whose tropes and rules have remained strikingly similar across historical periods. Some years ago I wrote a comparative study of the Roman poet Juvenal and rapper Eminem to make that point.

  • Physics and Astronomy’s Demo Lab Coordinator Bill Berner demonstrates the effects of a Van de Graaff electrostatic generator to 250 Philadelphia-area high school students during the 20th Annual Physics Demonstration Show at Penn.

  • If you want to know the secrets of human ancestry and evolution, look no further than genetics, says Theodore Schurr.

  • A Q&A with PORES Director John Lapinski

  • Paleobiologist Lauren Sallan questions, and in some cases overturns, closely held tenets of paleontology.



  • Bonus content section for the Spring/Summer 2017 edition of the OMNIA magazine.

  • Moderated by Andrea Mitchell, CW'67, faculty discuss the past, present, and future of global immigration at annual event in New York City.

  • A new book examines members of the Indian diaspora, both Indian- and American-born, and offers reasons for their successes in the United States.

  • Since the 2016 election, scores of women across the nation have enlisted in political campaign training programs like Emerge America and Ready to Run. One researcher is gathering their data to understand why some women throw their hats in the ring while others don’t.

  • May 2016 marked the 50th anniversary of the launching of the Cultural Revolution in China, a political upheaval that rocked the country for a decade.

  • A new course brings together students from divergent disciplines with the hope of finding common ground.

  • In less than one year, Penn’s collection of Mongolian literature grew from just 600 titles held by Van Pelt-Dietrich Library to the fourth largest collection in the United States. All it took was a professor on a mission, an intrepid librarian, a serendipitous conference, a late-night browsing session, and an excursion to Inner Mongolia.

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