Faculty Archive

  • Meg Leja, a postdoctoral fellow at Penn’s Wolf Humanities Center, helps students get in touch with their ghostly sides.

  • Penn Arts and Sciences faculty bike varied terrain to get to campus.

  • Laurie Allen, Director for Digital Scholarship at Penn Libraries, and Penn's Price Lab for Digital Humanities are helping to immortalize the public art and history project.

  • Emily Wilson, Professor of Classical Studies, is the first woman to translate Homer’s classic into English.

  • Featuring Robert St. George

  • Antonio Feros, Associate Professor of History, on why Catalans—the people who populate the northeastern region of Spain—feel so strongly about their regional identity.

  • Rogers M. Smith, Associate Dean for the Social Sciences and Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, explains Puerto Rico’s political identity.

  • Halloween is Dark Matter Day—but don't be afraid of the dark.

  • Emily Steiner, Professor of English, uses new technology to illuminate age-old manuscripts.

  • Discover the stories behind the Associate Professor of History of Art's favorite office items.


  • Courtesy of Arjun Yodh

  • New grant initiatives have Penn Arts and Sciences faculty and students engaging with each other and the rest of the world.

  • Arts and Sciences faculty study how this key resource is changing—from warmer oceans to once-thriving waterways now inhospitable to life—and what that means for the world. 

  • Every spring and fall, Penn Arts and Sciences faculty present 60-second campus talks (rain or shine!), on topics ranging from human history and the knowable universe, to fractions and fly-fishing.

  • Investigating the brain's innate ability to map our surroundings

  • Paul Sniegowski, the newly appointed Stephen A. Levin Family Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, riffs on research, teaching, and the liberal arts.

  • Richard Berk, professor and chair of the Department of Criminology, discusses fairness in the criminal justice system in OMNIA op-ed.

  • Jane Austen died 200 years ago on July 18, 1817, at the age of 41. We don’t know why she died so young, although theories include Addison’s disease, lymphoma, even accidental arsenic poisoning.

  • Often, immigrating to a foreign country means taking on a new identity, a complex process of adjustment and acculturation. When race comprises a part of a national identity, the process becomes even more complicated.

  • Twentieth-century Spain was marked by political upheaval. The Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) ended with a victory for General Francisco Franco, who ruled the region as a fascist dictator until his death in 1975. Then began La Transición, the transition to a constitutional monarchy and democracy.

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